How Does Your Company Measure Your Potential?

Understanding how your employer gauges your potential can have a major impact on your position at the company, and on your career. If you know what they’re looking for in an employee, you can improve your chances of advancement.

When a manager is evaluating an employee’s potential, they’re considering factors like motivation, skill, experience, and the willingness and ability to learn, and evaluating how that employee can or will impact the company as it moves forward into the future.

Clearly, there is variation in terms of what different companies and management teams look at when determining an employee’s potential. But some factors are common, even if they may seem obvious. Still, knowing how your employer measures your potential can be valuable information both for your own personal development and for your advancement within the company. Here are a few commonly-used indicators.

Quality of Work

There are many ways for an employer or manager to asses the quality of your work. It might be through a series of specifically stated goals they’ve set for you, or through subjective analysis from your direct supervisor or manager. There is also what’s known as the 9-Box Grid method of assessment, a graph with one axis representing an employee’s potential, and the other their performance. So, a high-performing but low-potential worker would be ideal in their current role, while a low-performing but high-potential employee would be in need of coaching to unlock that potential. Other factors companies use to measure performance can be as simple as tracking the number of errors an employee has made, or, depending on the nature of their work, quantitative statistics like the number or amount of sales made or units produced.

360/180-Degree Feedback

The concept behind 360-degree feedback is for an employer to get performance feedback from a staff member’s direct manager, colleagues, subordinates, and customers. This can be done through specific questions or as a more general performance evaluation. Alternately, 180-degree feedback is similar, but is limited to the employee’s co-workers and manager, and is typically utilized when the worker doesn’t manage people and/or interact with customers.

Leadership Potential

Many businesses will also consider their employees’ potential to rise to a leadership position. Part of management is being able to observe when employees demonstrate a knack for managing others, delegating duties, and taking responsibility for projects. In a small or medium-sized business, it’s often easier for management to get a feel for an employee’s abilities and potential to advance by direct observation. (It also costs a business more to hire and train new employees than to promote an internal candidate.) Factors like drive, organizational skill, the ability to learn quickly and think on their feet, and empathy towards colleagues are some of the traits a good manager will look for when assessing an employee’s leadership potential. The Korn Ferry Institute, an authority on leadership and recruiting, has its own test for measuring leadership potential that takes into account many of these traits and more.

Once you have an idea of how your company measures your potential, you’ll be able to adjust your behaviour accordingly and focus on the right things. Whether it’s making a point of being in the office early every day, contributing in meetings, helping your colleagues with their projects, or just putting in the extra effort when executing your duties, demonstrating your potential to management is a sure-fire way to get ahead.

 

Justin Anderson | Assistant Editor

How to Organically Get on Your Clients’ News Feeds

With Facebook’s ever-changing algorithm, it’s essential to adjust your strategy to land the most views and interaction on the social network. The organic reach of most Facebook posts doesn’t get to nearly as many people as it used to, so you might have to work a little harder. Here are some tips to land your business’ page on potential clients’ news feeds without having to shell out the money to pay for the exposure.

Publish Evergreen Content
If you post timeless content, then your audience will be able to “like” and comment on it for a longer period of time. As more people keep liking and commenting, the increased engagement probes the Facebook algorithm to ensure that your post gets distributed further, and that it appears in other peoples’ feeds for longer. If you plan on repeating blogs, come up with a new image, title, and description so people don’t get tired of seeing the same post over and over.

Engage
This is an obvious one, but don’t underestimate the benefits of engaging with your audience, including sharing the posts of others. As you read other blogs, like and share them with a one or two-line comment. Liking and commenting are obvious ways to engage, but also be sure to use and encourage emojis – they rank higher on Facebook than a like.

Tag People
Tag people in your posts, but don’t just tag any random profile. Tag people that you know will have an opinion or get pumped about the post. If you know that someone will be excited, passionate, or even angry about the subject, having them comment will create a conversation. If you can create conversation, the algorithm will automatically make it show up in more news feeds. If you don’t want to tag specific people, you can also ask a question that will immediately increase engagement while prompting others to respond.

Share Video and Image Content
Users prefer to engage with video and images, rather than text or link posts because they’re usually seen as boring and are generally more time-consuming than video and images. It’s easy to like and share a picture or video without having to click through to another webpage or read a lengthy article before deciding if it’s worth sharing. And if you can create your own video content, even better. Make sure there’s a clear call to action at the end of the post, such as “like this post if you agree” or “tag a friend who would like this”.

Make Use of Facebook Groups­
Facebook groups can be surprisingly supportive. Type your niche or business plus “group” in the search bar and browse through the results until you find some that might be interested in your posts. By posting links and a short blurb on these groups, you can increase your traffic and exposure.

Although the organic reach on Facebook has gone down significantly, you can still land on news feeds without having to pay a penny or harassing your audience for views. You just have to know what Facebook is pushing at the moment and strategize accordingly. To work with the recently updated algorithm, you can add an image if you’re going to use a link, actively engage with your audience, encourage conversation, and don’t be afraid to start making your own video content.

 

Helen Jacob | Staff Writer