Recruiting Metrics Businesses Should Consider

Recruiting metrics are used to gather and analyze information to improve a business’ hiring process. Recruiters and stakeholders must remain aware of evolving trends to successfully manage turnover.

Sourcing Quality Hires

Recruiting managers are deployed to proactively leverage the sourcing channels used to hire quality recruits. Some of the most common sourcing channels include referrals, recruitment agencies, resume search, social media shares, notifications, career sites, and other job boards. To ensure recruiter efficiency, metrics and activities reported in a timely manner can identify potential problems and opportunities for improvement.

 

Pipeline Development

A key business goal is to develop a pipeline of quality candidates, which hiring managers can call upon when positions have to be filled. This facilitates easy tracking and monitoring of leads, while also managing traditional metrics, such as the Interview-to-Offer Ratio (the number of interviews to the number of offers extended) and Offer-to-Acceptance Ratio (the number of actual hires versus the hiring goal).

 

New Growth Attrition Rates

In some cases, more time is spent on replacing employees instead of growing the team. Some businesses experience higher turnover rates in particular industries, which can result in high vacancy rates. Lower turnover is a main indicator of the effectiveness of the recruitment process. It demonstrates that real value is being contributed to the growth and success of the business.

 

Performance Dashboards

To benchmark performance success, dashboards create a snapshot of key performance indicators for further examination and analysis. For instance, the amount of revenue generated is a clear indication of whether a growing organization should hire. They also act as a tool to measure productivity.

 

Candidate Satisfaction

Satisfaction ratings can provide essential feedback from new hires and employees who are seeking opportunities for internal mobility. From the candidate’s perspective, feedback from the interview process through post-recruitment surveys can influence the company’s recruitment strategy. The surveys can identify gaps in the recruitment process and provide critical information for the improvement of recruitment campaigns.

In the information age, many businesses have implemented software tools, such as the Human Resource Information Systems, which aid in facilitating easy review of pertinent human resources functions. Most importantly, this system software encompasses metrics for monitoring and tracking recruiting data. Success factors can be achieved when a business efficiently and effectively understands the benefits derived from making investments in the Human Resource Information System.

 

L. Chadee | Contributing Writer

How to Handle an Employee Gone Rogue

You know that person at the office who seems to consider themselves above the rules? That’s a rogue employee. But sometimes, rogue behaviour isn’t as obvious. Someone may openly disobey policies or disrespect management, or a seemingly perfect worker may be committing serious offences in secret, such as stealing company data, pilfering money, spying on behalf of a competitor, or sabotaging their colleagues.

There are ways to detect a rogue employee early. It’s can be the person you demoted because they no longer seemed to be the ideal fit for the role they were hired for. Or the member of the management team that consistently ignores company policies or the opinions of others when making changes. If their rogue behaviour has already been identified, they’re likely already on the bubble – one more misstep and they’re out. But before firing them, it’s best to consider the value they bring. Discuss the employee’s overall performance with other managers and HR. If they haven’t caused a high level of offence, determine whether you want to give them a chance to change.

In the meantime, there are ways you can prevent rogue employees from inflicting damage on the organization by limiting and monitoring their access to information. Use identity and access management (IAM) software to increase security. With IAM software, you can regulate the amount of access employees have to pertinent data and files depending on their role. Look for software that records login information and activity for each user, allows them to update their own profiles, and can handle a large volume of users in the system without compromising performance.

If it’s a disrespectful employee you’re dealing with, evaluate how you position yourself as a manager: are you too lenient with the person in question? Do you allow them to break certain rules? Are they doing whatever they want? If you tolerate a workspace in which certain people can behave this way while others can’t, then you’re the problem. But whether you’ve been unwittingly encouraging such behaviour or not, reexamine the way you treat all employees. Reimplement the company values and the most important policies. Present these policies and guidelines clearly, as outlined in the employment agreement, to everyone.

Fellow coworkers can help handle a rogue colleague and spot other potential threats if they’re trained in detecting rogue behaviour. For example, if an employee notices their colleague taking frequent trips to the photocopier or printer when their job doesn’t really require, there’s a possibility the employee is stealing company info or using the machine for personal things. A properly-trained employee could ask their coworker about the issue (their frequent use of a machine); maybe their colleague is stealing proprietary company secrets, delivering that information to a competing business or using it for their own entrepreneurial project. Keeping employees aware of these sorts of issues will increase awareness and create a more stable and secure work environment. If anybody feels disrespected by a fellow colleague or is suspicious of their conduct, they should feel empowered to report them.

Speaking of corporate espionage, you may want to do some digging yourself. Take a look at the rogue employee’s social media channels. Ensure they’re abiding by the organization’s social media policy and aren’t bad-mouthing the company (and/or its affiliates or partners), especially after a significant incident like a demotion or another disciplinary issue. This would be detrimental to brand image and cause distrust among your customers, which is obviously bad for business.

– Joséphine Mwanvua
 

Business photo created by yanalya – www.freepik.com

Resolving Conflict in the Workplace

Conflict happens. Differences of opinion and different work styles can create problems, straining relationships between coworkers and reducing their efficiency and productivity. They may become unmotivated and dread coming into the office. But if properly handled, conflict can also be an opportunity to move toward a better organized work environment.

Below are some steps to help managers avoid and resolve conflict in the workplace:

Communication

Clear communication plays an important role in avoiding conflicts in the workplace. Be very clear and specific with your message and communicate in a way that everyone can understand. When talking with or emailing your colleagues, make sure they understand everything being discussed, as misunderstandings can lead to more problems in the future. Ensure that all necessary information is being properly conveyed to avoid this.

Clarify Misunderstandings

When conflicts arise, bring both parties together and let them have a professional and respectful conversation. Make sure each party understands the other’s point of view. At the end of the discussion, make sure an agreement of some sort has been reached and any misinterpretations are addressed.

Consider All Sides

Speak with each party individually to understand the issue behind the conflict. Ask them for suggestions on how to best avoid this situation in the future. After hearing everyone out, analyze the feedback and focus on the problem itself rather than the specifics of who did what. Any action taken should be with the goal of improving the overall work environment. Meet again with the parties involved and provide your solution. Be impartial and emphasize what’s best for the company in order to avoid future complications.

Eliminate Negative Feelings

Solve the problem in a manner that helps both parties feel like the issue has been resolved in an acceptable manner, ideally with no lingering bitter feelings. Everyone should be satisfied with the solution so that the work environment remains a respectful and friendly place.

Be Cooperative

Everyone has their own way of working and accomplishing tasks. Don’t impose your ideas on others and instead consider their views. Avoid bias, treat everyone equally, and be fair with all your employees and coworkers. Bring it to their attention when they make mistakes, but also applaud them for a job well done. If you make mistake, apologize, and accept your part in causing the problem. Never assume any conflict is insignificant; always try to solve it as soon as possible, rather than letting it fester. Try using written notes or emails to help your peers understand the solution to a problem. And always keep the bigger picture in mind.

Structure

Encourage collaboration. Create a structure that facilitates teamwork and requires staff to work together to complete tasks. This is one of the most effective conflict-resolution techniques and it will make employees realize the importance of working as a team to support each other.

Regardless of the specific workplace, everyone expects a friendly and healthy setting when they’re doing their job. It’s everyone’s responsibility to create a positive work environment. It eliminates stress and keeps employees cheerful. More importantly, it brings out the best in people on a daily basis and helps increase productivity.

U. Lakhia

Workplace Wellness Programs

Studies have proven that the physical and mental conditions of employees affect the productivity of a business. Therefore, companies should implement workplace wellness programs to improve the health and nutrition of their workers. In addition to benefitting existing employees, these features also attract other skilled workers to join the company. Here are various examples of effective workplace wellness programs that will make your company a coveted place to work at.

Health Programs

This is one of the most important programs that employers include in employment packages. This can range from health/dental insurance to therapeutic massage sessions. In Canada, OHIP covers general health care, but areas that they do not compensate are major concerns for the public. It would be an attractive incentive if companies included benefits that the government didn’t. This reflects the company’s consideration in their employees’ well-being.

Onsite Gym

A lot of people these days are conscious about fitness. This is why the gym industry is making good business through membership sales. Going to the gym has become a routine for many people. However, a lot of working professionals would complain that it’s too time consuming to juggle work, sleep, and the gym. As a result, they would have to sacrifice either their sleep or the gym, both of which would affect their health in the long run. Having a gym facility in the office would solve this dilemma.

Other Fitness Alternatives

Of course, an onsite gym would be a large expense for most companies. Other alternatives include a regular yoga or Pilates session. These exercises are cost-friendly; each session can include a big group of people. They are stress-relieving methods and will give you a break from the normal routine of the work environment. In addition to encouraging their fitness, these sessions would inspire mental recovery.

Free Meal/Organized Lunch

A cafeteria with a set schedule of different meals per workday could prove beneficial for the entire company. In addition to saving time and money for employees, it allows the employer to monitor the regular diet of their employees. The typical half-hour lunch break offers employees little option of food to choose from. If they aren’t able to bring their own lunch, they will tend to choose something from a fast-food menu. Eventually, this will take its toll on the employee’s health.

There are numerous workplace wellness programs that your company can implement. More employees are looking for these benefits in their job searches. The more wellness programs your company has, the more it will persuade effective workers to support you. It might require the business to expend more money; however, the benefits will reap in the future. As long as your company looks out for the employees’ well-being, the workplace will emit a positive atmosphere.

– J. Tjoandi

The Importance of an HR Department

To have a successful company, it is extremely important to understand the importance of an HR department. Human Resources is more than a department; it encompasses different facets and plays significant roles. Its existence is vital for any business, big or small.

An effective HR department plays many roles within a company. Here are some examples of the variety of roles filled by a good HR department, likened to various professions.

  • Engineers: HR is tasked with structuring, restructuring, planning, and analyzing systems and procedures to make sure they are aligned with business objectives. HR also develops succession plans by identifying promising employees with the requisite capabilities to eventually transition into leadership roles. This is significant as it can guarantee a business’ stability and future success.
  • Doctors: The HR department diagnoses the company culture, as well as structural and operational strengths and weaknesses that are fundamental to organizational competence and effectiveness.
  • Guidance Counsellors: HR prevents and resolves conflict in the workplace, which is inevitable given the diversity of personalities, work styles, backgrounds and levels of experience among employees. The HR department also sees to it that all issues concerning employment are addressed and guides the staff on performance, as well as helps them embrace the company’s philosophy and business principles.
  • Law Enforcement: Human resources ensures that everyone in the organization complies with rules and regulations, and reprimand those who breach them to avoid repeat offences.
  • Safety Officers: The HR department helps keep the work environment free of accidents and other things that would compromise occupational health and safety of the company and its workforce.
  • Marketing & Sales: HR advertises open positions in the company to attract candidates, and work to build the business into being a top employment destination.
  • Purchasers: The HR team negotiates the best price to procure the most comprehensive benefits package, and also works on salary offers.
  • Trainers & Facilitators: HR helps acclimate newly hired employees and helps train them on their assignments and duties. HR also keeps the entire staff updated on the latest policies and procedures that could affect their responsibilities.
  • Quality Assurance: The HR department ensures that employee performance meets standards. Some HR champions ISO certification to guarantee staff commits to the process, products, and services of the company.
  • Lawyers: Human resources mediates the relationship between workers, employers, trade unions and government, and monitor the company’s adherence to legal and labour laws.
  • Consultants: The HR team advises management on how to handle specific staff members’ issues in a professional manner.

Because HR is charged with a variety of challenging responsibilities, it’s difficult to give a simple explanation for why having a strong HR department is so important. It bridges management to employees and vice versa, helping divisional and unit groups to focus on their functional accountabilities.

HR’s depth and breadth is measured by how effectively and efficiently it manages the company’s most important asset and capital investment: human resources. The HR department must do all of these things in order to help the company achieve its ultimate goal of ensuring that employees and customers alike are enjoying the best experience possible.

 

M. Beltran | DBPC Blog

8 Tips to Manage Toxic Employees and Managers

Toxic Employees and Managers

For most managers, learning how to effectively lead a team is a daunting task. Understanding what skills everyone brings to the table, and how to use them to the company’s advantage, is a challenge on its own. But oftentimes the most difficult part of management is knowing how to deal with that one employee or manager. The one who always seems to be in the middle of a heated argument, the one whose name is constantly brought up in HR meetings. Here are a few tips on how to manage a toxic employee or manager.

 

How to handle a toxic employee:

 

Look Past Their Brilliance

 

To form an objective opinion on a difficult employee, you need to separate their work performance from their behaviour. Sometimes the most competent worker can have a poor attitude, which eventually affects the rest of the team. This can be destructive to the company’s morale in the long run, so how do you correct the problem? Start by keeping an eye on their team dynamics; jot down feedback from their co-workers; document HR complaints. Make it clear that the employee’s performance is not relevant to the issue, but rather it’s their attitude that’s a problem. Once you stop rationalizing their troubling behaviour because of the value they bring to the organization, you’ll begin to see the full picture more clearly.

 

Reinforce Accountability for Everyone

 

There’s only one set of rules for the whole team, and everyone should understand that. If others become aware that certain people get a pass for their bad behaviour, resentment and dysfunction will begin to simmer beneath the surface. Be firm with your team and make your expectations clear. Establish the ground rules for appropriate behaviour, and reinforce the penalties for not adhering to them.

 

Be Proactive

 

Observe the individual in action, provide feedback and coach them if necessary; these are your tools for implementing real change. If you create opportunities where you can work with the individual and provide constructive feedback, you can offer advice to improve their behaviour and show them alternative ways to approach a situation. Equally as important, make sure you provide positive feedback to the individual when it’s justified; this well help them see how situations can be handled with a positive approach moving forward.

 

If There’s No Progress, Go Further

 

Once you’ve implemented the above steps, you’ll have to assess whether the individual is making progress. Be honest with yourself; if the employee continues to disrupt the work environment, you must take further action. Keep your superiors informed of the entire process, as they need to understand how this employee’s negativity impacts the entire team and overall productivity. You may want to work with your HR specialist as well to develop and implement an escalation program which includes termination for lack of compliance.

 

 

How to handle a toxic manager:

 

Learn to Speak Their Language

 

Dealing with a difficult boss is not an ideal situation for an employee. But sometimes learning more about your boss – their likes, dislikes, goals and fears – can work in your favour. Observe your boss’s behaviours and preferences; if you speak to your boss’s core interests and match their style of communication, it can be a great way to get them to listen to what you have to say.

 

Focus on Their Strengths, Help with Their Weaknesses

 

You can help your boss by emphasizing what they’re already good at. A great way is to help them improve their own performance. If your manager lacks organization, offer to help him or her stay on top of their schedule. If showing up late to meetings is a problem for your boss, take the initiative to start the next one yourself. If you help your boss succeed, you’ll be seen as an asset, and the work you’ve put into making the company better will be appreciated.

 

Address Your Concerns Directly

 

Don’t be afraid to speak up, you owe it to yourself and your boss to be honest about how you feel. Although it may be easier to keep quiet or move on to the next opportunity, give your boss a chance to respond. If you approach them respectfully and with the intent of mending the relationship, you may be surprised to see it open a new level of trust and collaboration between you. And at the very least, you can tell yourself that you gave them the opportunity to change.

 

If All Else Fails, Prepare for Your Next Move

 

You’ve exhausted all your resources, and you’re content to move on to another company, so prepare yourself for this change. There’s nothing worse than escaping one toxic work environment and moving to an even worse one, so do your research: Meet your new co-workers for coffee and learn more about the work culture; ask questions about the team you may be joining and what sort of management practices are common. Whether you’re moving internally to another department or joining a new company entirely, it never hurts to be prepared.

 

 

Aileen Ormoc | DBPC Blog

Creating Openness Within Your Team

Human Resources

Everyone who has ever worked on a team will agree that the key ingredient to a successful team is collaboration, yet few have a thorough understanding of what this entails. Collaboration is a team’s ability to interact efficiently and work towards achieving a common goal. However, numerous studies show that without openness, any opportunity for collaboration will be lost, and the team will fail.

What’s the best way to create a sense of openness within your team? Consider the following tips:

Open Communication is Key

Open communication is not limited to your organizational hierarchy or a set team meeting. Team members should have access to opportunities and resources to communicate whenever and wherever it’s necessary. One way to create an open communication dynamic is for yourself and your team to familiarize yourselves with Tuckman’s Team Development Model. Assess what stage your team is at, and proceed from there.

Actively Listen to Team Members

While many of us hear what others are saying, we rarely truly listen. By encouraging team members to listen to one another and acknowledge understanding of their peers’ ideas, you’re facilitating improved productivity in all relevant processes. If your company employs remote workers, always make them feel as if they are in the room with the rest of your team to help encourage effective participation.

Establish Transparency Across All Operations

Transparency in your business practices is one of the shortest paths towards creating an open and supportive workplace. Before team members can trust one another, they need to be able to trust that the company’s mission, vision, and values are in line with their own. Not only will this improve collaboration within your team, but it also encourages accountability for every action taken.

Turn Failures into Learning Opportunities

The largest setback for many a team is the fear of failure, which often stems from leaders who focus on the here and now rather than the big picture. Remember, there is no innovation without risk. The simplest way to get this message across is to openly encourage risk-taking within your team. Although not all risks lead to rewards, allowing your team members to implement their own personal touch in company operations promotes trust and flexibility in the workplace.

Plan Regular Team-Building Exercises

At the end of the day, a team is a group of human beings who must feel comfortable to step outside of their respective comfort zones to share their ideas with others. In addition to open group discussions, members should be encouraged to grow closer through informal activities, such as lunch outings, to help promote mutual support and trust.

Openness inspires creativity. As Steve Jobs once said, the larger your “bag of experiences,” the more diverse the connections you can make between the ideas set before you. Creating a sense of openness within your team is not only beneficial for the team’s overall performance, but also for each team member’s individual growth and development.

 

 

Diana Spektor | DBPC Blog

Detecting Employee Harassment

Employee harassment is something that should be foreseen. It is crucial that employers and employees search for any signs of distressed coworkers. Not everyone handles harassment the same way; an employee may present the issue to a manager while another might become annoyed and cause an unnecessary scene. Another thing to keep in mind is that not everyone is comfortable with reporting incidents of harassment and discrimination. Employees may fear retribution or that they’ll be disfavored by fellow coworkers, thus adding additional stress. The culture of a workplace plays a big role as it determines whether or not an employee is comfortable with coming forward with an issue. The following tips can help managers identify workplace harassment and take the necessary measures in response:

 

Maintain Open Communication and Engagement

Communicate with your employees daily to distinguish any differences in their mood and better understand how they’re feeling each day. Be sure to monitor any unusual shifts in an employee’s behaviour as this can be an indicator that something is wrong. Unusual extended behavior is a clue and should be looked into. Doing this will help strengthen both relationships between employees as well as the workplace culture, and it’ll be easier for employees to voice an issue to a manager.

 

Carefully Oversee the Workplace

Employees will be able to ask questions and raise concerns with ease if a manager is always visible and accessible to everybody in the workplace. Try to monitor employees as they work, but in a non intimidating way. In doing so, you can deal with any small problems that can be handled quickly (such as any company violations). Keeping an eye on employees will allow you to quickly identify any changes. If an employee suddenly stops talking to their normal group of co-workers, you may want to look into the cause of this. A manager should be interested in their employees’ tasks, and answering any questions they may have.

 

Record Employee Work Conduct

Any incidents where an employee is subject to harassment or discrimination immediately affects their productivity and relations at work. Monitor the performance of employees to analyze any drastic changes that raise concerns. If the employee doesn’t want to work in a group with certain co-workers, this could be a sign of harassment. Even though this may not be the case in particular, you should always be cautions or you might regret it.

 

Investigate Reasons for Resignation/Turnover

There are a number of reasons why employees decide to leave a company. Some may decide to leave unexpectedly without much notice or a clear reason. It could be the case that they did not like something about the job, even though they were very proficient in their daily tasks. One of the obvious reasons why people leave is because of an increase in salary or other personal reasons. Also, some may leave due to harassment. Either way, it is important to conduct a short exit interview with an employee to learn more about their decision to resign.

 

 

K. Nwankwo | DBPC Blog

Unfair Management Practices

Have you ever questioned the fairness of your management practices? An obvious gauge of how you’re doing is your relationship with your staff and how often you’re the subject of HR interventions. But some bosses get away with unfairness without a word, often because employees are intimidated or fear for their jobs. For all those in a managerial role, here are some unfair practices that you need to identify and cease (listed in order of severity).

 

Illegal practices

That’s right, illegal practices – because discrimination, harassment and the denial of employees’ rights are against workplace fairness and equity legislation.

Have you ever limited, segregated, classified or deprived staff of opportunities “based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, family status, disability and pardoned conviction”? Have you been directing any intentionally offensive and improper conduct toward an employee? Have you withheld from your workers any of their legal entitlements including a fair wage and public holiday pay?

If you’ve engaged in any of these unfair practices, you may have broken the law. You’ll be required to give an account when one of your employees takes union or legal action.

 

Unprofessional practices

A tier below criminally unfair managerial behaviours are those that are unprofessional and inappropriate. Managers can be unfair in the way that they display nepotism or favouritism. Getting along with some staff better than others is only natural, but a line is crossed when managers recruit, promote or give preference to less qualified employees based on the fact that they are related, have a personal friendship or share a common affinity.

Other inappropriate practices include taking credit for an employee’s work, unjustified exclusion from important projects or meetings, and denying well-deserved promotions or raises without explanation. Managers can also demoralize employees by publicly shaming or teasing them. All of these damaging behaviours can lead to staff lodging grievances to your organization.

 

Unhelpful practices

The third category of unfair behaviours includes those that are simply unhelpful and unpleasant. Each person has different personality traits and cultural influences, as well as insecurities, sensitivities and varying levels of social/emotional intelligence. People can rub each other the wrong way and have different ideas of what behaviour is acceptable in the workplace.

A manager can think that it’s okay, even motivating, to treat employees with excessive criticism, sarcasm, ostracism or (subtle) aggression. Other managers can unintentionally exhibit hostility or unreasonableness under the pressure of job stress or dramas in their personal life, though this isn’t an excuse. If you’ve knowingly or unknowingly treated your employees to these kinds of behaviours, cut it out, up your professional game and resolve to be a fairer manager.

 

J. Paik | DBPC Blog

 

Tips for Presenting Yourself Professionally Via Email

Have you ever enthusiastically waited for electronic correspondence from a colleague, only to find yourself disappointed by the poorly-written email they sent to you? Unfortunately, this is a common occurrence. Many people, when sending out an email, overlook one simple yet important detail – professionalism. Here are a few tips on how to present yourself professionally when using email.

Select a professional email address – Get off on the right foot by wisely selecting your email address, since a poorly chosen email address can annoy recipients.

Let’s say that your name is Ashley Lynn Thomas and you recently applied for a job. While the hiring manager likes your background/experience and initially thinks that you could be a great asset to the company, he or she questions your maturity after reading your email address: Ashley2hot4u@hotmail.com.

While that might sound cool or funny to your friends – the hiring manager isn’t impressed. Consider the following alternatives instead:

  • al@gmail.com
  • ashleythomas@gmail.com
  • thomas@gmail.com
  • ashley@gmail.com
  • ashleylynnthomas@gmail.com

Avoid nicknames – It is much more professional to have your name appear instead of the email address when sending out an email. This will instantly allow the recipient to determine the identity of the sender, while possibly hiding an inappropriate email address.

Keep your subject line short– A subject line should be short and informative so the recipient will quickly understand the purpose of the email. Leave everything else for the body of the email. Most people simply don’t have the time to read a subject line that’s as long as the email itself.

Use your own domain – Having your own website such as www.ashleylynnthomas.com allows you to create an email address from that domain, such as ashley.thomas@ashleylynnthomas.com. It’s beneficial to have a professional email account specifically for business purposes.

Use a clean signature – Keep your signature elegant yet readable. Include your full contact information such as your company’s name, location, social media links and websites. Unless they represent you or your company, avoid using graphics, letter heads or irrelevant logos.

 

L. Ghafoor | DBPC Blog